Blue Angels Skipper, Captain Arthur R. Hawkins, USN (Ret.)

In this U.S. Naval Institute oral history excerpt, Captain Hawkins speaks about his becoming the first man to perform a through-the-canopy ejection from a jet aircraft on 4 August 1953, when his aircraft, an F9F-6 Cougar of the Blue Angels, encountered trouble at 42,000 feet. After enlisting in the Naval Reserve in April 1942, Hawkins Read more about Blue Angels Skipper, Captain Arthur R. Hawkins, USN (Ret.)[…]

Seaplanes: The End (of the beginning)

By the end of the war, the Navy had a number of advanced seaplane designs in the works – the JRM Mars and H-4 Hercules, the Spruce Goose, in particular. These were developed as large (or, in the Hercules case, extremely large) transport seaplanes. The H-4 had a similar mission to some of the earliest Read more about Seaplanes: The End (of the beginning)[…]

The Naval Act of 1794: Piracy and the U.S. Navy’s Re-Birth

I learned something today, dear reader. For nine long years, the United States didn’t have a Navy. Nine years! Between August 1785 and 27 March 1794, there were no Naval officers, nor sailors, not even a single ship to the Navy’s name. Yes, today is the anniversary of the rebirth of the United States Navy, Read more about The Naval Act of 1794: Piracy and the U.S. Navy’s Re-Birth[…]

Today in Submarine History

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day we remember the Irish-born John Phillip Holland and the Holland IV. 1898: John P. Holland’s submarine, Holland IV, performs the first successful diving and surfacing tests off Staten Island, New York. Read more about Holland and his submarines here. https://www.navalhistory.org/2012/03/17/uss-holland-ss-1-makes-her-first-successful-submerged-run-17-march-1898   Another anniversary, 1959: USS Skate (SSN-578) becomes the Read more about Today in Submarine History[…]

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